Sierra Club Arizona Legislature 2010 Environmental Report Card – Make it happen.

Sierra Club Arizona Legislature 2010 Environment Report Card – PDF

Give this a read if you care about doing anything outside of a hermetically sealed room with filtered and chemically treated water. If you believe in science and care about what comes next these are the issues you need to keep at the forefront. This is long term planning for the place we live. If we dont have drinking water there is no point.

Here is how the officials in my area did on the Sierra Club Arizona Legislature 2010 Environmental Report Card:

Way to go Ken Cheuvront for most improved!

Senator Ken Cheuvront (D-15) improved from a “D” on the 2009 report card to an “A” on the 2010 report card. Senator Cheuvront helped point out the silliness of the light bulb bill and stood up for parks and clean water. His grade improved considerably this session, because he missed very few votes. We appreciate his support for environmental protection over the years as leaves the legislature after 16 years of service.

City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 Part 1 of 5

Reading through the City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 and once again it hits home that we are in a reverse stage of the cities growth. The 82 page PDF titled – Schedule 1: Proposed General Fund Budget Reductions by Department covers a $139 Million dollar reduction. I suggest you read through this. It is amazing to see what we have government for.

I suggest you attend a hearing if you have anything to say about this proposed budget: Phoenix Budget Hearings

A few things stood out for me but it cascaded into a really long post. Turns out we are cutting a lot of shit out of the budget this year. So here is part 1 of 5:

Page 8 – Community and Economic Development
Eliminate a Building Code Examiner position on the Non-permitted Construction Team. This will reduce investigations of non- permitted construction, further adding to the current backlog of over 5,000 complaints. This may result in unsafe conditions and deterioration in the quality and livability of neighborhoods.
$(151,000)

Yikes!

Page – Environmental Programs
1. Eliminate an Environmental Programs Specialist that supervises the Pollution Prevention Unit. Eliminating this position will adversely impact compliance with state and federal hazardous materials and waste management laws.
$(113,000)

Lets grow three eyes!

City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 Part 5 of 5

Reading through the City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 and once again it hits home that we are in a reverse stage of the cities growth. The 82 page PDF titled – Schedule 1: Proposed General Fund Budget Reductions by Department covers a $139 Million dollar reduction. I suggest you read through this. It is amazing to see what we have government for.

I suggest you attend a hearing if you have anything to say about this proposed budget: Phoenix Budget Hearings

A few things stood out for me but it cascaded into a really long post. Turns out we are cutting a lot of shit out of the budget this year. So here is part 5 of 5:

Page 58-64 Police
1. Eliminate the Municipal Court Enforcement Detail (MCED). This reduction will shift fine collections to external collection agencies and existing Municipal Court staff. The savings from this reduction are reflected in the Municipal Court.
(2.0 Sworn)

2. Eliminate two Municipal Security Guards in the Transit Bureau. These positions provide fixed post security at the light rail operations and maintenance center. The savings from this reduction are reflected in Public Transit.
(2.0 Civilian)

3. Eliminate a portion of the Walking Beat at the Phoenix Convention Center. The savings from this reduction are reflected in the Convention Center.
(2.0 Sworn)

4. Eliminate four Police Commander positions and one Police Sergeant. This reduction will increase the span of control for several police functions and require reorganization.
(1,278,000) (5.0 Sworn)

5. Reduce Sworn overtime. This reduction will reduce specialty training and eliminate funding for CALEA certification. The department will work to ensure that this reduction does not impact service delivery or response times.
(2,087,000)

6. Eliminate the Cadet/Explorer Program. This reduction will affect the department’s ability to recruit youth. Also reflected is the elimination of a Police Officer in the Reserve Division which will impact the department’s ability to adequately manage reserve officers.
(1,268,000) (3.0 Sworn) (13.0 Civilian)

7. Eliminate two Police Officer positions in the G.R.E.A.T. program. This reduction will affect the department’s ability to teach the gang resistance curriculum to at-risk youth.
(236,000) (2.0 Sworn)

8. Eliminate the Employee Assistance Unit (EAU) in the Administrative Services Bureau. This reduction will require staff to rely on the Police Employment Services Bureau and the City’s contracted Employee Assistance Program (EAP).
(621,000) (3.0 Sworn) (1.0 Civilian)

9. Eliminate four civilian support positions in the Traffic, Fiscal Management, and Employment Services Bureaus. This reduction will require the remaining staff in these areas to assume additional work and could result in backlogs.
(389,000) (4.0 Civilian)

10. Eliminate the Community Programs Unit in the Planning and Community Relations Bureau. This reduction will adversely affect the department’s ability to coordinate community outreach programs.
(1,118,000) (9.0 Sworn)

11. Eliminate six positions in the Public Affairs Bureau. This reduction will affect the department’s ability to actively respond to media requests and other public records requests.
(781,000) (4.0 Sworn) (2.0 Civilian)

12. Eliminate one Lieutenant, one Sergeant and four Police Officers in the Training Bureau. This reduction is a result of the anticipated reductions and continued hiring freeze for sworn personnel.
(847,000) (6.0 Sworn)

13. Eliminate the sworn component of the Property Purge Team and two additional Police Officer positions in the Property Management Bureau. This reduction will shift duties to remaining staff and increase the response time for the release of property.
(847,000) (6.0 Sworn)

14. Eliminate one of two Inspection Squads in the Professional Standards Bureau. This will negatively affect the department’s ability to perform internal audits.
(408,000) (3.0 Sworn)
15. Eliminate four Police Assistants in the Traffic Bureau. This reduction will affect the department’s ability to coordinate its abandoned vehicle efforts.
(316,000) (4.0 Civilian)

16. Eliminate one Police Officer and two civilian support positions in the Administrative Services Bureau. This reduction will shift duties to remaining staff and require reorganization.
(293,000) (1.0 Sworn) (2.0 Civilian)

17. Eliminate one Sergeant and two Police Officers in the Homeland Defense Bureau. This reduction will affect the department’s ability to provide security at various downtown municipal buildings.
(408,000) (3.0 Sworn)

18. Eliminate the Mounted Unit in the Homeland Defense Bureau. This reduction will affect the department’s crowd control efforts.
(700,000) (5.0 Sworn)

19. Eliminate the Bias Crimes/Graffiti Squad in the Planning and Community Relations Bureau. This will affect the department’s efforts to investigate bias and graffiti crimes.
(710,000) (5.0 Sworn) (1.0 Civilian)

20. Eliminate a Criminal Intelligence Analyst in the Crime Analysis and Research Unit (CARU). This will affect the department’s ability to analyze crime trends and patterns.
(109,000) (1.0 Civilian)

21. Eliminate the Call Back Unit in the Communications Bureau. This will affect the department’s ability to manage lower priority calls for service and shift duties to patrol officers. Response times for non- priority calls will be impacted.
(510,000) (1.0 Sworn) (9.0 Civilian)

22. Eliminate a Community Action Officer from each precinct. This will affect the department’s ability to deliver effective community-based policing and limit the department’s interaction with community groups.
(710,000) (6.0 Sworn)

23. Eliminate one Lieutenant, one Sergeant and one Police Officer from the Professional Standards Bureau. This reduction will reduce the department’s ability to perform internal investigations and respond to use of force allegations.
(493,000) (3.0 Sworn)

24. Eliminate six Lieutenants, 12 Sergeants, and 131 Police Officers from Patrol. This reduction will affect the department’s crime suppression efforts citywide and negatively affect response times.
(20,615,000) (149.0 Sworn)

25. Eliminate the Career Criminal Squad within the Major Offender Bureau. This reduction will affect the department’s crime suppression efforts related to organized crime groups and street gangs.
(645,000) (5.0 Sworn)

26. Eliminate the Liquor Enforcement Task Force in the Drug Enforcement Bureau. This reduction will affect the department’s ability to process and investigate liquor license applications and permits.
(964,000) (7.0 Sworn) (1.0 Civilian)

27. Eliminate 13 Police Officers responsible for Crime Free Multi- Housing, Crime Abatement, and Crime Analysis functions. This reduction will weaken the department’s community based policing efforts.
(1,538,000) (13.0 Sworn)

28. Eliminate the Fugitive Apprehension Unit (FAU) and Street Crimes Unit in the Major Offender Bureau. This reduction will result in the department making fewer felony arrests negatively affecting crime suppression.
(1,998,000) (16.0 Sworn)

29. Eliminate one Neighborhood Enforcement Team (NET) from each precinct (6 of 18). This reduction will affect the department’s community-based policing efforts.
(6,706,000) (54.0 Sworn)

30. Eliminate one of three Auto Theft Squads in the Property Crimes Bureau. This reduction will result in fewer auto theft investigations.
(645,000) (5.0 Sworn)

31. Eliminate sworn and civilian support staff in the Property Crimes Bureau. This reduction will result in fewer theft investigations and shift duties to remaining staff.
(1,106,000) (8.0 Sworn) (2.0 Civilian)

32. Eliminate 14 Police Communications Operators in the Communications Bureau. This reduction will not impact response times but will impact the department’s ability to maintain adequate staffing in the Communications Bureau.
(915,000) (14.0 Civilian)

33. Eliminate two Night Detective Sergeants in the Violent Crimes Bureau. This will reduce the department’s ability to investigate homicides, robberies, and assaults.
(343,000) (2.0 Sworn)

34. Eliminate four Lieutenants and nine Sergeant positions throughout the department. This reduction will increase the span of control for various police functions and require reorganization.
(2,354,000) (13.0 Sworn)

35. Eliminate one Lieutenant, one Sergeant, and ten Police Officer positions in the Drug Enforcement Bureau. This reduction will negatively affect the department’s drug investigation efforts.
(1,557,000) (12.0 Sworn)

Total $(53,515,000) (353.0 Sworn) (56.0 Civilian)

Get yer guns!!!

City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 Part 4 of 5

Reading through the City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 and once again it hits home that we are in a reverse stage of the cities growth. The 82 page PDF titled – Schedule 1: Proposed General Fund Budget Reductions by Department covers a $139 Million dollar reduction. I suggest you read through this. It is amazing to see what we have government for.

I suggest you attend a hearing if you have anything to say about this proposed budget: Phoenix Budget Hearings

A few things stood out for me but it cascaded into a really long post. Turns out we are cutting a lot of shit out of the budget this year. So here is part 4 of 5:

Page 38 to 54 Parks and Recreation
1. Eliminate City of Phoenix funding provided to the Latino Institute for special events and reduce City of Phoenix financial support for the Cinco De Mayo, Pride, and Martin Luther King events by 50%.
$(44,000)

2. Reduce frequency of contracted palm tree pruning from every year to every other year on 14 major streets and Enchanted Island at Encanto Park.
(30,000)

3. Eliminate equestrian patrol program used on trails at South Mountain Park, the Phoenix Mountain Preserve, the Sonoran Preserve, Papago Park, and flatland parks. This reduction will eliminate the use of horses for all educational programs and signature programs such as National Trail Trek.
(20,000)

4. Increase span of control in department divisions. This will eliminate one Deputy Parks Director position and will require the merger of divisions. This reduction also includes eight Recreation Coordinators, a Management Assistant I, and two Secretary II positions that provide support for volunteer coordination, youth and adult sports programs, and public information services. This will require assigning duties to remaining staff and will reduce the department’s ability to implement projects and respond to citizen requests.
(1,322,000) (12.0)

5. Close Cortez Pool. Because recent inspections found damage that will require repairs to the pool shell and gutter system estimated at a cost of $900,000, the pool will be closed indefinitely. Closure of this pool will eliminate open swim, water safety programs, swimming lessons, and senior water aerobics for more than 19,000 participants. This was one of eight pools closed on a rotating basis for repairs in the prior year.
(61,000) (1.3)

6. Close Shemer Art Center and Museum. The Shemer Art Center is a historical site and is a family- oriented art education center and museum with over 5,000 patrons annually. The City will be seeking public/private partnerships in an effort to restore some services. Reductions include one Recreation Coordinator and a part-time Recreation Leader position. Revenue generated from this program is estimated at $9,000.
(82,000) (1.3)

7. Eliminate Daring Adventures, River of Dreams, and support for Special Olympics. Daring Adventures and River of Dreams provide adaptive recreation programming including hockey, biking, kayaking and cross country skiing for young persons with significant disabilities. The Special Olympics program creates an opportunity for children, teens, and adults with intellectual and physical disabilities to train and compete in organized sporting events. This reduction includes two Recreation Coordinator positions and two Recreation Programmer positions. Revenue generated from this program is estimated at $8,000.
(333,000) (4.0)

8. Reduce staff and programs at the Pueblo Grande Museum. The museum will have only basic housekeeping performed by a contract custodial service. Tree trimming will be reduced from bi-monthly to monthly and trash will be emptied weekly versus daily. Turnaround time for archaeological review of public and private construction projects, as required by federal and state law, and for archaeological collections will increase from three weeks to four weeks. This will eliminate a Museum Assistant position and convert a full-time Museum Aide to part-time and a Semiskilled Worker to a part-time Groundskeeper.
(102,000) (1.5)

9. Reduce maintenance and supervision at Papago Park, Rio Salado Restoration Area Project, and South Mountain Park. This will eliminate a Park Manager, three Groundskeepers, and a Building Maintenance Worker position. The loss of the Park Manager will reduce the monitoring of restored habitat permits and the coordination of research projects with ASU and other colleges. The loss of Groundskeeper and Building Maintenance Worker positions will reduce maintenance of park grounds and trails, equipment, and facilities. Restroom cleaning and tree trimming will be reduced from three times per week to infrequently and fewer ramada reservations will be accepted.
(433,000) (5.0)

10. Eliminate seven Park Ranger positions assigned to mountain parks and preserves, which represents a 15% reduction in force. This will result in closing mountain parks and preserves and gated trailheads at 7:00 p.m. daily. Facilities with gated access will not be open for summer holidays. This will result in fewer staff to respond to violations of park rules or inappropriate use of park property by the public. The public will experience closed parking lots, gates, and restrooms after 7:00 p.m. and patrons entering parks after hours through neighborhood access points will need to call the Phoenix Police or Fire Department if emergency assistance is needed.
(667,000) (7.0)

11. Close Phoenix Center for the Arts. Over 16,000 patrons use the theater, four classrooms, multipurpose room, visual arts studios, and art galleries. This facility generates $26,000 in revenue annually. The City will seek public/private partnerships to assist in restoring the center’s operations. This will eliminate a Recreation Coordinator, a Customer Service Clerk, and 1.0 part-time staff.
(153,000) (3.0)

12. Reduce hours at Desert West Softball Complex. The complex will be closed during the week and at night on weekends. The complex is used for leagues and tournament play by 28,000 adult softball participants. Desert West hours are being reduced due to the poor condition of the field lighting system and capital expense needed for improvements. This will leave patrons without leagues to participate in and youth will be unable to use the complex for practice. Annual revenue generated from complex activities is estimated at $30,000. This eliminates a Groundskeeper and a part-time Recreation Instructor position.
(66,000) (1.7)

13. Reduce citywide street landscape maintenance by more than 32%. This will reduce staff from one for every 27 acres to one for every 42 acres. Maintenance frequency for major arterial areas will be driven by citizen complaint and emergencies, and it will take up to a week to respond. Many areas will reflect blighted conditions. Inspection and removal of visual and physical obstructions for pedestrians and vehicle operators, irrigation system inspection and repair, routine tree and shrub care, and removal of uncontained debris and weeds will be significantly impacted. Reduction includes 11 Groundskeeper positions.
(632,000) (11.0)

14. Reduce neighborhood and community park maintenance. The City has 205 neighborhood and community parks that cover nearly 5,500 acres. For larger community parks, maintenance frequency will be based on the number of reservations, usage, and amenities. Maintenance frequency of mini- parks, basins, and neighborhood parks will be serviced every other day versus the current daily schedule. At all parks, cleanliness, accessibility, and non-emergency equipment repairs will take longer to be corrected. This eliminates six Groundskeeper positions and other support staff.
(571,000) (8.0)

15. Close Arizona Horse Lovers Park, North Mountain and South Mountain Visitor Centers and Rio Salado Customer Service Center. This will eliminate all community use of the horse arenas and maintenance of the 18 mile trail system. The visitor centers will no longer be available for meetings, training, and ramada reservations. Visitors will no longer be able to view exhibits and the South Mountain Environmental Education Center and the Activity Complex will no longer be accessible to visitors. This reduction includes eliminating the Customer Service Clerk position, which will result in calls being routed to the main reservation line with messages taking up to 7 days to return. This also eliminates three Recreation Coordinators, a Semiskilled Worker, two Groundskeeper positions, and estimated revenue of $39,000.
(671,000) (9.0)

16. Eliminate the citywide softball program and part-time maintenance staff in the Northwest and Northeast Divisions. The citywide softball program is organized by the City and provides recreational opportunities for approximately 10,000 participants, including 500 teams playing 4,650 games annually and generates $43,000 in revenue. The program will end in July 2010 at the close of the current season. The reduction of maintenance staff will result in longer frequencies for trash pick-up, graffiti removal, cleaning of restrooms, tree trimming, and weed control. Grass will be mowed at a 14-day frequency versus twice a week. This eliminates a Recreation Coordinator and part-time Recreation Aides and Groundskeeper positions.
(179,000) (6.3)

17. Eliminate recreation programming and staff supervision at the Rose Mofford and Encanto Park Sports Complexes. These facilities offer a variety of amenities including: basketball courts, lighted racquetball and tennis courts, volleyball courts, concessions, and an office to check out recreation equipment. The facilities will be open to the public but activities will be unsupervised. This will eliminate organized tennis programs at both Encanto Park Sports Complex and Herberger Park affecting 116 participants. Amphitheater Island at Encanto Park, which serviced 175 bookings, will no longer accept individual reservations. Recreation equipment will not be available to check out and racquetball courts will be locked to deter criminal activity. Annual revenue loss is estimated at $74,000. This eliminates three Recreation Coordinators, two Recreation Programmers, a Gardner, a Groundskeeper, and 6.0 part-time positions.
(664,000) (13.0)

18. Significantly reduce staff that provides support for special facilities at Margaret T. Hance Park and Civic Space Park. Staff assists with the coordination of events and rental reservations at these locations, which includes the Japanese Friendship Garden and the Irish Cultural Center. The City’s coordination of special events such as the MLK Jr. celebration, October Fest, St. Patrick’s Day, and First Fridays will be significantly reduced or eliminated. Hance Park had over 760 rentals/bookings last year, generating over $14,000 in revenue. Civic Space Park has supported 48 bookings with an estimated attendance of 15,200 patrons, generating $4,000 in revenue. This will eliminate one of two Recreation Coordinator positions and 2.0 part- time staff.
(161,000) (3.0)

19. Close the garden at Tovrea Castle and increase span of control in the Natural Resources Division. The elimination of the sole maintenance position for the garden at Tovrea Castle garden will result in closure of the site to the public. The thousands of plants on site will receive minimal care, and the building and grounds will deteriorate. Weekend garden tours and the Master Gardener program will be eliminated. The elimination of an Administrative Assistant II position will require a reorganization of the Natural Resources Division to redistribute the complex management and permit oversight of the Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area to remaining staff. The Rio Salado Habitat has 595 acres of restored habitat. Tours of the restored habitat will no longer be provided.
(193,000) (2.0)

20. Close Camp Colley. Camp Colley is an outdoor adventure camp located in northern Arizona that provides structured, supervised recreation opportunities for young people. An agreement between the City and the Camp Colley Foundation is in place through June 30, 2010. This eliminates a Park Manager position.
(122,000) (1.0)

21. Reduce maintenance and programming at the Reach 11 Soccer Complex and the Diamondbacks Field of Dreams Baseball Complex. The 18 soccer fields will be mowed every two weeks versus two times per week, over-seeding will be eliminated, and the level of fertilizer, top dressing, and aerification will be greatly reduced. The soccer complex will not meet national tournament standards, which will greatly impact the City’s ability to host state, regional, and national soccer tournaments. Organizations renting the baseball complex will have to line the fields and put out bases on their own. Limited staff will remain to clean restrooms, pick-up trash, and groom baseball fields. Programs and events will not be supervised. This eliminates an Administrative Assistant II, Park Foreman, Park Manager, two Equipment Operators, two Groundskeepers, a Recreation Leader, a Recreation Coordinator and part-time positions.
(898,000) (11.5)

22. Eliminate the Phoenix Afterschool Centers (PAC) summer program and City funding for the Boys and Girls Club program. This will impact 2,200 school age children at 16 locations operated by the City. Reductions include 14.2 part-time staff and $249,000 in estimated revenue. This will also reduce support to the Homes and Gable Boys and Girls Clubs for teen programming.
(471,000) (14.2)

23. Close eight neighborhood recreation centers that are currently open only in the summer, including one located at a County-owned public housing site. Neighborhood recreation centers offer 8-week summer recreation programs and activities for youth ages 7-17 at Barrios Unidos, Central, Grant, Holiday, Smith, South Phoenix Youth Center, and Thunderbird Teen Center. These seven centers had over 24,000 user visits last year. The Housing Department will now fund the programs at the three recreation centers located at City- owned housing sites (S.P Osborn, Foothills, and Luke Krohn). The center located at Coffelt, which is owned by the County, will be closed. This eliminates 2.4 part- time positions.
(119,000) (2.4)

24. Close seven year-round neighborhood recreation centers and eliminate West Phoenix Revitalization recreation programming. The Sunnyslope Youth Center and Verde, University, Playa Margarita, Marc Atkinson, Hayden, and Harmon recreation centers have 251,000 user visits annually and offer free programs for youth and adults. Grant-funded programs for adults with developmental disabilities, and violence prevention education, can no longer be supported if these centers close. This represents a loss of $327,000 in grant funds. The elimination of West Phoenix Revitalization recreation programming will cancel three outdoor safe park programs that serve hundreds of youths annually and reduce coordination of events and fund raising supported by communities. The department will no longer be able to fulfill its part of the West Phoenix Revitalization Plan. This eliminates ten Recreation Coordinators and 14.9 part-time staff.
(1,482,000) (24.9)

25. Close Desert West, Rose Mofford, and Papago Softball Complexes. These facilities provide adult and youth softball leagues and tournaments for approximately 330,000 participants on over 700 teams annually. The revenue generated from these complexes is estimated at $221,000. This eliminates a Foreman, three Groundskeepers, two Recreation Coordinators, and 2.9 part-time positions.
(348,000) (8.9)

26. Reduce Park Rangers assigned to mountain parks and preserves. This will eliminate seven Park Ranger positions, which represents an additional 18% reduction in force. This will result in further reducing hours at mountain parks and preserves from 7 days a week 5:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., to 5 days a week (Wednesday – Sunday) from 5:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. This will result in significantly fewer staff to respond to violations of park rules or inappropriate use of park property. City sponsored events like Phoenix Summit Challenge, National Trail Trek, and National Public Lands Day will no longer be held. Public and private events such as filming requests, Cancer Climb, National Parks America Tour, and Pueblo Grande Indian Market will no longer take place.
(551,000) (7.0)

27. Eliminate the Phoenix Afterschool Centers (PAC) school-year programs. This will result in the closure of 36 general funded sites, 14 revenue supported sites, and 5 full cost-recovery sites. This impacts 2,300 school aged children. The loss of revenue is estimated at $200,000. The grant funded Nutrition Education and Training program will be eliminated as a result of this reduction. This USDA funded program provides nutrition, health, and physical activity education. This represents a loss of $353,000 in grant funds. Reductions include a Recreation Supervisor, twenty Recreation Programmers, eighteen part-time Recreation Instructors, sixteen part- time Recreation Aide positions, and six Recreation Coordinator positions.
(1,989,000) (61.0)

28. Close 5 of 13 large community centers: Deer Valley, Desert West, Devonshire, Mountain View, and the Washington Activity Center. Reduce operating hours from 65 to 40 hours per week at 8 remaining community centers. Senior Center operations at shared facilities will not be impacted by this reduction. These centers offer classes, programs, and special events for residents. The closure of facilities will eliminate meeting places for community organizations, boards and commissions, and planning committees. Reduced hours will eliminate over 1,100 classes, programs, and special events. Rental of facilities will no longer be available before or after the centers’ hours of operation. This will reduce maintenance levels for remaining facilities by 33 to 50% depending on the facility size and will lead to longer cleaning and repair cycles. Only minimal maintenance staff will remain at closed centers to monitor vandalism and mechanical breakdowns. Reductions include 38 full-time and 23.5 part-time positions, and revenue of $42,000.
(3,864,000) (62.5)

29. Reduce citywide street landscape maintenance by an additional 43%. Maintenance frequency for major arterial areas will be driven by citizen complaint and emergencies and will take over a week to respond. This reduction combined with prior reductions leaves one staff for every 74 acres. Many areas will reflect blighted conditions. Inspection and removal of visual and physical obstructions for pedestrians and vehicle operators, irrigation system inspection and repair, routine tree and shrub care, and removal of uncontained debris and weeds will be significantly impacted. Reduction includes six Groundskeepers, three Gardeners, and a Parks Foreman position.
(617,000) (10.0)

30. Further reduce neighborhood and community park maintenance. The City has 205 neighborhood and community parks that cover nearly 5,500 acres. For larger community parks maintenance frequency will be based on the number of reservations, usage, and amenities. Maintenance frequency for mini- parks, basins, and neighborhood parks will be every third or fourth day versus the current daily schedule. At all parks cleanliness, accessibility, and non-emergency equipment repairs will take longer to be corrected. This eliminates six Groundskeeper positions.
(338,000) (6.0)

Total $(17,183,000)
(298.5)

City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 Part 3 of 5

Reading through the City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 and once again it hits home that we are in a reverse stage of the cities growth. The 82 page PDF titled – Schedule 1: Proposed General Fund Budget Reductions by Department covers a $139 Million dollar reduction. I suggest you read through this. It is amazing to see what we have government for.

I suggest you attend a hearing if you have anything to say about this proposed budget: Phoenix Budget Hearings

A few things stood out for me but it cascaded into a really long post. Turns out we are cutting a lot of shit out of the budget this year. So here is part 3 of 5:

Page 31-32 Library
1. Reduce direct customer service staff at the Burton Barr Library. This will reduce in-person assistance to customers seeking information at all service desks and staff assistance via telephone, e-mail and the Library’s website. This will also eliminate the Library’s ability to provide Braille translation for City staff. Accessibility Center services will be available by appointment only.
$(452,000) (5.0)

2. Reduce library hours of operation at all 15 branches by 8 hours per week by closing on Fridays. Burton Barr Central Library’s current hours of operation will not change, and Library branches currently operating with Sunday hours will remain open for four hours on Sunday. This reduction will leave the library branches open between 40-44 hours per week, depending on the branch, and, therefore, sharply limit the availability of public computers with internet access; and further reduce or eliminate library materials access, classes, public forums, and other community services.
(818,000) (10.8)

3. Close Century (1750 E. Highland Avenue), Acacia (750 E. Townley Avenue), and Ocotillo (102 W. Southern Avenue) branch libraries. Closure will eliminate service for the respective surrounding communities including teens, adults, businesses and families with children. The eliminated services include: access to library materials, public computers with internet access, and educational and recreational activities developed for various age groups such as the family reading program, Babytime for infants, and Toddler time for children ages 24-36 months. These libraries serve approximately 659,000 people each year.
(2,015,000) (21.3)

4. Close Desert Sage (7602 W. Encanto Blvd.), Saguaro (2808 N. 46th Street), and Yucca (5648 N. 15th Avenue) branch libraries. Closure will eliminate service for the respective surrounding communities including teens, adults, businesses and families with children. The eliminated services include: access to library materials, public computers with internet access, and educational and recreational activities developed for various age groups such as the family reading program, Babytime for infants, and Toddler time for children ages 24-36 months. Closure of these additional branches will also eliminate five support staff positions. These libraries serve approximately 882,000 people each year.
(3,572,000) (36.4)

Total $(6,857,000) (73.5)

Its good that we don’t the kids read so they have more time to do drugs and light shit on fire…

City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 Part 2 of 5

Reading through the City of Phoenix Budget Proposal for 2010 and once again it hits home that we are in a reverse stage of the cities growth. The 82 page PDF titled – Schedule 1: Proposed General Fund Budget Reductions by Department covers a $139 Million dollar reduction. I suggest you read through this. It is amazing to see what we have government for.

I suggest you attend a hearing if you have anything to say about this proposed budget: Phoenix Budget Hearings

A few things stood out for me but it cascaded into a really long post. Turns out we are cutting a lot of shit out of the budget this year. So here is part 2 of 5:

Page – 15 to 18 – Fire
1. Reduce funding for overtime by adjusting and reprioritizing the training schedule for on-going training, High-Rise training, and Specialty Response Teams.
$(1,273,000)

2. Relocate the Ambulance Billing Function to City-owned space. (271,000)

3. Eliminate civilian support positions from the Crisis Response Team, Technical Services, Ambulance Billing, and Administration, Personnel, Operations, Payroll, and Public Affairs Sections. These positions may impact the department’s ability to perform many administrative duties in a timely manner.
(1,307,000) (13.3 Civilian)

4. Eliminate one Assistant to the Fire Chief who serves as the Fire Marshall. This reduction will increase the span of control and potentially impact service delivery.
(210,000) (1.0 Civilian)

5. Eliminate three Fire Prevention Supervisors and nine Fire Prevention Specialists responsible for ensuring compliance with the Fire Code. This reduction will result in scheduling delays as fewer staff will be available to perform inspection-related duties.
(1,014,000) (12.0 Civilian)

6. Eliminate two Fire Battalion Chief*Deputy positions assigned to Fire Prevention and Safety. This reduction will negatively impact the sworn span of control and will require some reorganization.
(519,000) (2.0 Sworn)

7. Eliminate one Fire Captain*40-Hour position assigned to the Fleet Management Division and one Firefighter*40-Hour position assigned to the Health Center. The loss of these two positions will negatively impact the department’s ability to effectively manage the fleet and Health Center.
(307,000) (2.0 Sworn)

8. Eliminate one Media Production Specialist position in the Public Affairs Section. This will reduce the number of public education campaigns related to home and life safety issues.
(112,000) (1.0 Civilian)

9. Eliminate three (of eight) Fire Battalions consisting of nine Fire Battalion Chief*56-Hour positions and nine Fire Captain*56-Hour positions. This will degrade supervisory span of control of fire station personnel and possibly affect response times for command staff.
(3,457,000) (18.0 Sworn)

10. Eliminate one (of two) Shift Command unit, consisting of three Fire Battalion Chief*Deputy 56-Hour positions, three Fire Captains, and one Secretary II position. This reduction will affect span of control and require some reorganization to reduce the impact it may have on incident command response times.
(1,301,000) (6.0 Sworn) (1.0 Civilian)

11. Eliminate two Fire Emergency Dispatchers and one Fire Communications Supervisor in the Dispatch Section. This will affect the department’s ability to maintain staffing standards but will not impact service delivery or response times.
(247,000) (3.0 Civilian)

12. Eliminate three (of 22) full-time One and One Rescue Units that provide supplemental paramedic coverage to paramedic Engine Companies. Also reflected is the elimination of one (of 11) 12-hour part-time paramedic rescue. The loss of these units will negatively affect response times, as fewer units will be available to respond to calls for service.
(3,075,000) (18.0 Sworn)

13. Eliminate six (of 64) Engine Companies that provide fire and medical emergency services in a specific geographic area. This reduction will negatively affect response times, as fewer units will be available to respond to calls for service.
(10,935,000) (84.0 Sworn)

14. Eliminate one (of 13) Ladder Company that plays a critical role in fire support and emergency medical incidents. This will increase response times, causing delayed fire ground and emergency medical activities.
$(1,786,000) (14 Sworn)

Total – $(25,814,000)
(144.0 Sworn)
(31.3 Civilian)

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